Keyword: optics
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MOP04 Status of the JAEA-ADS Superconducting LINAC Design linac, cavity, emittance, operation 30
 
  • B. Yee-Rendón, Y. Kondo, F. Maekawa, S.I. Meigo, J. Tamura
    JAEA/J-PARC, Tokai-mura, Japan
 
  The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is working in the research and development of an Accelerator Driven Subcritical System (ADS) for the transmutation of nuclear waste. To this end, JAEA is designing a 30-MW cw proton linear accelerator (linac) with a beam current of 20 mA. The JAEA-ADS linac starts with a Normal Conducting (NC) up to an energy of 2.5 MeV. Then, five Superconducting (SC) sections accelerate the beam up to 1.5 GeV. The biggest challenge for this ADS linac is the stringent reliability required to avoid thermal stress in the subcritical reactor, which is higher than the achieved in present accelerators. For this purpose, the linac pursues a strong-stable design that ensures the operation with low beam loss and fault-tolerance capabilities to continue operating in case of failure. This work presents the beam dynamics results toward achieving high reliability for the JAEA-ADS linac.  
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poster icon Poster MOP04 [0.764 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-HB2021-MOP04  
About • Received ※ 30 September 2021 — Revised ※ 15 October 2021 — Accepted ※ 22 November 2021 — Issue date ※ 05 January 2022
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MOP09 HL-LHC Beam Dynamics with Hollow Electron Lenses electron, emittance, operation, simulation 59
 
  • P.D. Hermes, R. Bruce, R. De Maria, M. Giovannozzi, A. Mereghetti, D. Mirarchi, S. Redaelli
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • G. Stancari
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  Each of the two proton beams in the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will carry a total energy of 720 MJ. One concern for machine protection is the energy stored in the transverse beam tails, estimated to potentially reach up to 5% of the total stored energy. Several failure scenarios could drive these tails into the collimators, potentially causing damage and therefore severely affecting operational efficiency. Hollow Electron Lenses (HEL) were integrated in the HL-LHC baseline to mitigate this risk by depleting the tails in a controlled way. A hollow-shaped electron beam runs co-axially to the hadron beam over about 3 m, such that halo particles at large amplitudes become unstable, while core particles ideally remain undisturbed. Residual fields from e-beam asymmetries can, however, induce emittance growth of the beam core. Various options for the pulsing of the HEL are considered and are compared using two figures of merit: halo depletion efficiency and core emittance growth. This contribution presents simulations for these two effects with different HEL pulsing modes using the final HL-LHC optics, that was optimized at the location of the lenses.  
poster icon Poster MOP09 [0.970 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-HB2021-MOP09  
About • Received ※ 06 October 2021 — Revised ※ 02 November 2021 — Accepted ※ 22 November 2021 — Issue date ※ 19 January 2022
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MOP13 Influence of Transverse Motion on Longitudinal Space Charge in the CERN PS space-charge, synchrotron, emittance, impedance 83
 
  • A.J. Laut, A. Lasheen
    CERN, Geneva 23, Switzerland
 
  Particles in an intense bunch experience longitudinal self-fields due to space~charge. This effect, conveniently described by geometric factors dependent on a particle’s transverse position, beam size, and beam pipe aperture, is usually incorporated into longitudinal particle tracking on a per-turn basis. The influence of transverse betatron motion on longitudinal space~charge forces is, however, usually neglected in pure longitudinal tracking codes. A dedicated tracking code was developed to characterize the CERN PS such that an effective geometric factor of a given particle could be derived from its transverse emittance, betatron phase~advance, and momentum~spread. The effective geometry factor is then estimated per particle by interpolation without the need for full transverse tracking and incorporated into the longitudinal tracker BLonD. The paper evaluates this effect under conditions representative of the PS, where space~charge is dominant at low energy and progressively becomes negligible along the acceleration ramp. The synchrotron frequency distribution is modified and the filamentation rate is moreover increased, which could suggest a stabilizing space~charge phenomenon.  
poster icon Poster MOP13 [1.826 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-HB2021-MOP13  
About • Received ※ 16 October 2021 — Revised ※ 22 October 2021 — Accepted ※ 12 December 2021 — Issue date ※ 11 April 2022
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MOP20 Space Charge Resonance Analysis at the Integer Tune for the CERN PS resonance, space-charge, simulation, quadrupole 124
 
  • F. Schmidt, F. Asvesta
    CERN, Meyrin, Switzerland
 
  In the context of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project, a series of studies have been performed in order to better understand the beam brightness limitations imposed by resonances and space charge effects. Space charge simulations using the analytic (frozen) space charge solver as implemented in the MAD-X code conducted for the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) show that a particle approaching the integer tune of Qx = 6 demonstrates a resonant behavior. The analysis of the single particle transverse motion reveals the excitation of a second order resonance. The interplay of the space charge effect and the optics perturbation in the regime of the integer tune on this excitation was further investigated. The simulations were complemented with the analysis of the resonance driving terms coming from the space charge potential derived in a classical perturbative approach.  
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poster icon Poster MOP20 [5.934 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-HB2021-MOP20  
About • Received ※ 05 October 2021 — Revised ※ 20 October 2021 — Accepted ※ 24 December 2021 — Issue date ※ 12 April 2022
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MOP21 3D Symplectic Space Charge Implementation in the Latest Mad-X Version simulation, emittance, space-charge, experiment 129
 
  • F. Schmidt, A. Latina, H. Renshall
    CERN, Meyrin, Switzerland
  • Y.I. Alexahin
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  In 2018 as part of a collaboration between CERN and FNAL, the space charge (SC) implementation has been upgraded in a test version of MAD-X. The goal has been to implement the 3D symplectic SC kick together with a number of new features and benchmark it with earlier MADX-SC versions. Emphasis has given to the use of the Sigma Matrix approach that allows to extend MAD-X optics calculations. In the meantime, significant effort has been made to fully debug and optimize the code and in particular to achieve a speed-up of the simulations by a factor of 2. The code has been ported to the latest MAD-X version, the elaborated set-up procedures have been automated and a user manual has been written.  
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poster icon Poster MOP21 [1.236 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-HB2021-MOP21  
About • Received ※ 05 October 2021 — Revised ※ 21 October 2021 — Accepted ※ 11 November 2021 — Issue date ※ 12 April 2022
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THAC3 Exploring Quasi-Integrable Optics with the IBEX Paul Trap lattice, octupole, experiment, quadrupole 214
 
  • J.A.D. Flowerdew
    University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • D.J. Kelliher, S. Machida, S.L. Sheehy
    STFC/RAL/ASTeC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, United Kingdom
 
  An ideal accelerator built from linear components will exhibit bounded and stable particle motion. However, in reality, any imperfections in the magnetic field strength or slight misalignments of components can introduce chaotic and unstable particle motion. All accelerators are prone to these non-linearities but the effects are amplified when studying high intensity particle beams with the presence of space charge effects. This work aims to explore the non-linearities which arise in high intensity particle beams using a scaled experiment called IBEX. The IBEX experiment is a linear Paul trap which allows the transverse dynamics of a collection of trapped particles to be studied. It does this by mimicking the propagation through multiple quadrupole lattice periods whilst remaining stationary in the laboratory frame. IBEX is currently undergoing a nonlinear upgrade with the goal of investigating Quasi-Integrable Optics (QIO), a form of Nonlinear Integrable Optics (NIO), in order to improve our understanding and utilisation of high intensity particle beams.  
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DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-HB2021-THAC3  
About • Received ※ 08 October 2021 — Revised ※ 16 October 2021 — Accepted ※ 22 November 2021 — Issue date ※ 23 December 2021
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THBC1 Beam Acceleration with the Upgraded Riken Heavy-Ion Linac emittance, target, beam-transport, heavy-ion 231
 
  • T. Nishi, M. Fujimaki, N. Fukunishi, H. Imao, O. Kamigaito, T. Nagatomo, N. Sakamoto, A. Uchiyama, T. Watanabe, Y. Watanabe, K. Yamada
    RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Japan
 
  The performance of RIKEN heavy-ion linac (RILAC) has been upgraded with a new ECR ion source and superconducting linac booster (SRILAC). It is expected to play a major role in the synthesis of super-heavy elements (SHE), development of the technologies for production of medical radioisotopes, and as a powerful injector to RI Beam Factory. In this talk, I will report on the beam delivery for the SHE experiment that started in June 2020, especially on how to adjust the optics based on the measured beam emittance. We would also like to compare the simulated beam acceleration in RILAC with the measured emittance.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-HB2021-THBC1  
About • Received ※ 09 November 2021 — Revised ※ 16 November 2021 — Accepted ※ 23 November 2021 — Issue date ※ 27 November 2021
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