A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z    

Rees, D.

Paper Title Page
WPAT036 A 700 MHZ, 1 MW CW RF System for a FEL 100mA RF Photoinjector 2413
 
  • W. Roybal, D.C. Nguyen, W. Reass, D. Rees, P.J. Tallerico, P.A. Torrez
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico
 
  Funding: U.S. Department of Energy.

This paper describes a 700 MHz, 1 Megawatt CW, high efficiency klystron RF system utilized for a Free Electron Laser (FEL) high-brightness electron photoinjector (PI). The E2V klystron is mod-anode tube that operates with a beam voltage of 95 kV. This tube, operating with a 65% efficiency, requires ~96 watts of input power to produce in excess of 1 MW of output power. This output drives the 3rd cell of a 2-cell, p-mode PI cavity through a pair of planar waveguide windows. Coupling is via a ridge-loaded tapered waveguide section and "dog-bone" iris. This paper will present the design of the RF, RF transport, coupling, and monitoring/protection systems that are required to support CW operations of the 100 mA cesiated, semi-porous SiC photoinjector.

 
WPAT037 LANSCE RF System Refurbishment 2476
 
  • D. Rees, G. Bolme, S.I. Kwon, J.T.M. Lyles, M.T. Lynch, M. Prokop, W. Reass, P.J. Tallerico
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico
 
  The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is in the planning phase of a refurbishment project that will sustain reliable facility operations well into the next decade. The LANSCE accelerator was constructed in the late 1960s and early 1970s and is a national user facility that provides pulsed protons and spallation neutrons for defense and civilian research and applications. We will be replacing all the 201 MHz RF systems and a substantial fraction of the 805 MHz RF systems and high voltage systems. The current 44 LANSCE 805 MHz, 1.25 MW klystrons have an average in-service time in excess of 110,000 hours. All 44 must be in service to operate the accelerator. There are only 9 spares left. The klystrons receive their DC power from the power system originally installed in 1960. Although this power system has been extremely reliable, gas analysis of the insulating oil is indicating age related degradation that will need attention in the next few years. This paper will provide the design details of the new RF and high voltage systems.  
WPAT054 5 MW 805 MHz SNS RF System Experience 3280
 
  • K.A. Young, J.T. Bradley, T.W. Hardek, M.T. Lynch, D. Rees, W. Roybal, P.J. Tallerico, P.A. Torrez
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico
 
  Funding: Work supported by the U.S. DOE.

The RF system for the 805 MHz normal conducting linac of the Spallation Nuetron Source (SNS) accelerator was designed, procured and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory(LANL) and then installed and commissioned at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The RF power for this room temperature coupled cavity linac (CCL) of SNS accelerator is generated by four pulsed 5 MW peak power klystrons operating with a pulse width of 1.25 mSec and a 60 Hz repetition frequency. The RF power from each klystron is divided and delivered to the CCL through two separate RF windows. The 5 MW RF system advanced the state of the art for simultaneous peak and average power. This paper summarizes the problems encountered, lessons learned and results of the high power testing at LANL of the 5 MW klystrons, 5 MW circulators, 5 MW loads, and 2.5 MW windows.*

*Tom Hardek is now at ORNL.

 
WPAT061 Spallation Neutron Source High Power RF Installation and Commissioning Progress 3520
 
  • M.P. McCarthy, D.E. Anderson, R.E. Fuja, P.A. Gurd, T.W. Hardek, Y.W. Kang
    ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee
  • J.T. Bradley, D. Rees, W. Roybal, K.A. Young
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico
 
  Funding: SNS is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 for the U.S. Department of Energy.

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac will provide a 1 GeV proton beam for injection into the accumulator ring. In the normal conducting (NC) section of this linac, the Radio Frequency Quadupole (RFQ) and six drift tube linac (DTL) tanks are powered by seven 2.5 MW, 402.5 MHz klystrons and the four coupled cavity linac (CCL) cavities are powered by four 5.0 MW, 805 MHz klystrons. Eighty-one 550 kW, 805 MHz klystrons each drive a single cavity in the superconducting (SC) section of the linac. The high power radio frequency (HPRF) equipment was specified and procured by LANL and tested before delivery to ensure a smooth transition from installation to commissioning. Installation of RF equipment to support klystron operation in the 350-meter long klystron gallery started in June 2002. The final klystron was set in place in September 2004. Presently, all RF stations have been installed and high power testing has been completed. This paper reviews the progression of the installation and testing of the HPRF Systems.

 
TPPT039 Installation and Testing for Commissioning of Normal Conducting RF Linac Segment in the SNS 2571
 
  • Y.W. Kang, A.V. Aleksandrov, D.E. Anderson, M.M. Champion, M. Champion, M.T. Crofford, C. Deibele, G.W. Dodson, R.E. Fuja, P.E. Gibson, P.A. Gurd, T.W. Hardek, G.A. Johnson, P. Ladd, H. Ma, M.P. McCarthy, M.F. Piller, J.Y. Tang, A.V. Vassioutchenko, D.C. Williams
    ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee
  • J.A. Billen, J.T. Bradley, D. Rees, W. Roybal, J. Stovall, K.A. Young, L.M. Young
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico
 
  The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac employs both normal conducting and superconducting linac cavities that will inject a 1.0 GeV proton beam into its accumulator ring. The normal conducting segment of this linac accelerates the beam to 185 MeV and employs one RFQ and six DTL cavities powered by seven 2.5 MW, 402.5 MHz klystrons and four CCL modules powered by four 5.0 MW, 805 MHz klystrons. Installation and RF conditioning of the RF equipment for normal conducting linac segment have been completed at ORNL with the support of LANL experts. After conditioning the accelerating structures, the linac has been successfully commissioned with beam. This paper reviews the experience in installation, RF conditioning, and commissioning of the normal conducting linac accelerating structures and RF subsystems. Checkout and operation of the RF systems and structures including conditioning procedure establishment and test results compared to the RF design specifications will be discussed.

SNS is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 for the U.S. Department of Energy. SNS is a partnership of six national laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Jefferson, Lawrence Berkeley, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge.

 
WPAP033 State-of-the-Art Electron Guns and Injector Designs for Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) 2292
 
  • A.M.M. Todd, A. Ambrosio, H. Bluem, V. Christina, M.D. Cole, M. Falletta, D. Holmes, E. Peterson, J. Rathke, T. Schultheiss, R. Wong
    AES, Medford, NY
  • I. Ben-Zvi, A. Burrill, R. Calaga, P. Cameron, X.Y. Chang, H. Hahn, D. Kayran, J. Kewisch, V. Litvinenko, G.T. McIntyre, T. Nicoletti, J. Rank, T. Rao, J. Scaduto, K.-C. Wu, A. Zaltsman, Y. Zhao
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York
  • S.V. Benson, E. Daly, D. Douglas, H.F.D. Dylla, L. W. Funk, C. Hernandez-Garcia, J. Hogan, P. Kneisel, J. Mammosser, G. Neil, H.L. Phillips, J.P. Preble, R.A. Rimmer, C.H. Rode, T. Siggins, T. Whitlach, M. Wiseman
    Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia
  • I.E. Campisi
    ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee
  • P. Colestock, J.P. Kelley, S.S. Kurennoy, D.C. Nguyen, W. Reass, D. Rees, S.J. Russell, D.L. Schrage, R.L. Wood
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico
  • D. Janssen
    FZR, Dresden
  • J.W. Lewellen
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois
  • J.S. Sekutowicz
    DESY, Hamburg
  • L.M. Young
    TechSource, Santa Fe, New Mexico
 
  Funding: This work is supported by NAVSEA, NSWC Crane, the Office of Naval Research, the DOD Joint Technology Office and by the U.S. DOE.

A key technology issue of ERL devices for high-power free-electron laser (FEL) and 4th generation light sources is the demonstration of reliable, high-brightness, high-power injector operation. Ongoing programs that target up to 1 Ampere injector performance at emittance values consistent with the requirements of these applications are described. We consider that there are three possible approaches that could deliver the required performance. The first is a DC photocathode gun and superconducting RF (SRF) booster cryomodule. Such a 750 MHz device is being integrated and will be tested up to 100 mA at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility beginning in 2007. The second approach is a high-current normal-conducting RF photoinjector. A 700 MHz gun will undergo thermal test in 2006 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, which, if successful, when equipped with a suitable cathode, would be capable of 1 Ampere operation. The last option is an SRF gun. A half-cell 703 MHz SRF gun capable of delivering 1.0 Ampere will be tested to 0.5 Ampere at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2006. The fabrication status, schedule and projected performance for each of these state-of-the-art injector programs will be presented.